Events
Loading Events

Events Search and Views Navigation

May 2019

Tuesday, May 7, 2019
@12:30 pm
- 1:30 pm
Sherrerd Hall, 3rd floor open space
+ Google Map

CITP Luncheon Speaker Series: Erik J. Olsson – Does Google Read our Minds? Personalized Search, Filter Bubbles and Democracy

A popular belief is that the process whereby search engines tailor their search results to individual users, so-called personalization, leads to filter bubbles in the sense of ideologically segregated search results that would tend to reinforce the user’s prior view (filter bubble hypothesis). Since filter bubbles are thought to be detrimental to society, there have been calls for further legal regulation of search engines beyond the so-called Right to be Forgotten Act (EU, C-131/12, 2014). However, the scientific evidence for the filter bubble hypothesis is surprisingly limited. Previous studies of personalization in Google have focused on the extent to which different artificially created users get different result lists without taking the content of the webpages whose links are on the lists into account. This paper proposes a methodology that takes content differences between webpages into account drawing also on the activities of real (as opposed to artificial) users. In particular, the method involves studying the extent to which real users with strong opposing views on an issue receive search results that are correlated content-wise with their personal view. We illustrate our methodology at work, but also the non-trivial challenges it faces, by a pilot study of the extent to which Google Search leads to ideological segregation on the issue of man-made climate change. The second, more exploratory, part of the talk is devoted to a discussion of the extent to which filter bubbles if they exist, now or in the future, are detrimental to democracy.

September 2019

Tuesday, September 17, 2019
@12:30 pm
- 1:30 pm
306 Sherrerd Hall
+ Google Map

CITP Lunch Seminar: Matthew Salganik – Measuring the Predictability of Life Outcomes with a Scientific Mass Collaboration

Researchers have long theorized about the processes through which childhood experiences shape life outcomes. However, statistical models in the social science often have poor predictive performance. Despite this track record, policy makers are increasingly considering using complex predictive models for high-stakes decisions in settings such as criminal justice and child protective services.  In this talk, we present results from the Fragile Families Challenge, a scientific mass collaboration designed to assess the limits of predictability of life outcomes and improve our understanding of these limits. 

Tuesday, September 24, 2019
@12:30 pm
- 1:30 pm
306 Sherrerd Hall
+ Google Map

CITP Lunch Seminar: Ari Ezra Waldman – Privacy Discourse

This project is about the discourses of privacy and privacy law. It constructs the landscape of privacy discourse, where it has been, where it is going, and who it empowers along the way. Based on primary sources research, the project argues that the changing discourse around privacy is shifting power over our data from the field of law to terrain of technology, thereby weakening substantive privacy protections for individuals.

October 2019

Tuesday, October 1, 2019
@12:30 pm
- 1:30 pm
306 Sherrerd Hall
+ Google Map

CITP Lunch Seminar: Allison Chaney & Brandon Stewart – How Algorithmic Confounding in Recommendation Systems Increases Homogeneity and Decreases Utility

Recommendation systems are ubiquitous and impact many domains; they have the potential to influence product consumption, individuals’ perceptions of the world, and life-altering decisions. These systems are often evaluated or trained with data from users already exposed to algorithmic recommendations; this creates a pernicious feedback loop. We demonstrate how using data confounded in this way homogenizes user behavior without increasing utility.

Tuesday, October 8, 2019
@12:30 pm
- 1:30 pm
306 Sherrerd Hall
+ Google Map

CITP Lunch Seminar: Radha Iyengar Plumb – Oversight of Deliberative Decision Making: An Analysis of Public and Private Oversight Models Worldwide

Over the last several years, companies seeking to understand how to appropriately moderate content have grappled with a range of complex social and political issues. In November 2018, in a public note by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook announced its intention of creating a mechanism for external review and input on decisions about what violates Facebook Community standards by building an “independent body, whose decisions would be transparent and binding”. To better understand the range of oversight