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Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

March 2008

Thursday, March 27, 2008
@4:30 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Garrett Graff – The First Campaign: Why Tech is Central to Politics in 2008

Garrett M. Graff is an editor at the Washingtonian magazine, where he covers media and politics, edits the Capital Comment section, and serves as internet director. His first book, "The First Campaign: Globalization, the Web, and the Race for the White House," was published in December 2007 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He teaches graduate-level internet and social media at Georgetown University. From the first speeches, the 2008 presidential campaign has been shaped by technology at every level—from the candidates…

March 2009

Thursday, March 5, 2009
@4:30 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Symposium – Community and Municipal Wireless Systems

This event is open to the public. Reception to follow in the Bernstein Gallery The Center is committed to bringing together technologists and policy scholars around critical issues in the regulation of technology and the use of technology to achieve policy ends. We have identified the complex set of issues around community and municipal wireless as an especially important topic, due to its potential to address issues of equity in access to the Internet and related technologies, as well as…

April 2009

Tuesday, April 28, 2009
@4:30 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Paul Ohm – Law, Policy and the Limits of Anonymization

Reception immediately following in the Berstein Gallery Two recent, newsworthy events have upended our understanding of the privacy-protecting power of anonymization. America Online and Netflix each released millions of anonymized records containing the secrets of hundreds of thousands of users. In both cases, to the surprise of many, researchers were able to “deanonymize” or “reidentify” some of the people in the data with ease. Through recent events like these, Computer Scientists have taken giant strides in developing theories and techniques…

October 2010

Wednesday, October 6, 2010
@4:30 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Cybersecurity and China: Adam Segal, the Council on Foreign Relations

Adam Segal is the Ira A. Lipman senior fellow for counterterrorism and national security studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). An expert on security issues, technology development, and Chinese domestic and foreign policy, Dr. Segal currently leads study groups on cybersecurity and cyber conflict as well as Asian innovation and technological entrepreneurship. His forthcoming book Advantage: How American Innovation Can Overcome the Asian Challenge (W.W. Norton, 2011) looks at the technological rise of Asia. He is a research…

October 2014

Friday, October 3, 2014
@8:00 am
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Workshop on Digital Methods in Political Science

The Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance are co-sponsoring a day-long workshop on digital methods in political science on Friday, October 3, 2014, in Bowl 01 of Robertson Hall. CITP affiliates Matthew Salganik and Karen E.C. Levy will be speaking on the first panel at 9:00 am. For more information, please visit this site.

February 2015

Monday, February 9, 2015
@4:30 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Seth Stephens-Davidowitz: Big Data and the Social Sciences

Co-sponsored with the Woodrow Wilson School and the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance The internet revolution is generating unthinkable amounts of data, most of it untainted by the biases, unreliability and the expense of survey data. How can big data, alone or in combination with traditional sources, be used to answer questions that until now were considered unknowable? Seth Stephens-Davidowitz will give a public talk on Big Data and the Social Sciences. His work focuses on using big-data…

March 2015

Monday, March 23, 2015
@12:15 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Lunch Timer with Ed Felten and Paul Ohm – Law Enforcement Surveillance Technologies: Are There Effective Legal Limits?

This talk is the first in our "Can Law Keep Up with New Technology?" series of lunch timers. Each program explores the current state of an emerging technology and the legal and ethical considerations that stem from it. Here, the discussion between Ed Felten and Paul Ohm will focus on surveillance technologies, considering the capability to extract information from surveillance and the scope of the power to perform such searches. LAPA Fellow Jonathan Hafetz will moderate.

Monday, March 30, 2015
@12:15 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Lunch Timer with Peter Asaro and Sarah Tang – Non-Military Drones: What Laws and Ethics Do We Need?

This talk is the second in our “Can Law Keep Up with New Technology?” series of lunch timers. Each program explores the current state of an emerging technology and the legal and ethical considerations that stem from it. Peter Asaro and Sarah Tang will discuss non-military drones: what is possible now and in the near future using drone technology and how we should think about their effect on privacy in public space, considering surveillance and remote sensing capabilities. CITP Director Ed Felten will moderate.

April 2015

Monday, April 20, 2015
@12:15 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Lunch Timer with Raúl Rojas and Bryant Walker Smith – Can You Ticket a Computer?: Law and Policy Issues for Driverless Cars

This talk is the third and final in our "Can Law Keep Up with New Technology?" series of lunch timers. Each program explores the current state of an emerging technology and the legal and ethical considerations that stem from it. In this session, Raúl Rojas and Bryant Walker Smith will discuss driverless cars, exploring the path for incorporating these technologies into our infrastructure, society, and legal system.

Monday, April 27, 2015
@12:15 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Lunch Timer – Up to the Minute: Net Neutrality Decision – with Senior White House Advisor R. David Edelman

Earlier this year, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced a momentous decision in the field of technology policy, declaring its intention to regulate internet service providers such as Comcast and Time Warner as “common carriers” under Title II of the Telecommunications Act. As a result, the FCC for the first time has the regulatory teeth to prevent these providers from prioritizing some content over others, creating digital “fast lanes” that could fundamentally change the nature of the internet. Net neutrality advocates hailed the FCC decision as a big win, while opponents have argued the move will undermine innovation and investment in improved digital infrastructure.

April 2016

Monday, April 11, 2016
@12:15 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Law and Technology Lunch Time Series: Online Censorship

What is the current state of internet accessibility, and what technologies and policies can help protect international security and human rights in this area? Censorship -- and other forms of interference and control of the internet -- poses technical, legal, and political questions both when trying to assess the extent of the problem and when deciding how to react to it.

This panel is the second in a series of lunch-timers on law and technology. Each program explores the current state of an emerging technology and the legal, policy, and ethical considerations that stem from it.

Monday, April 18, 2016
@12:15 pm
Robertson Hall, Bowl 001

Law and Technology Lunch Time Series: Online Privacy in Europe Versus the United States

Food and discussion begin at 12:15 pm. Open only to current Princeton faculty, fellows and students. Please RSVP here. Co-sponsored with the Woodrow Wilson School and the Program in Law and Public Affairs Panelists: Sharon Goldberg, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Boston University Joel Reidenberg, CITP Fellow, Stanley D. and Nikki Waxberg Chair and Professor of Law, and Director of CLIP, Fordham University School of Law Solon Barocas (moderator), CITP Fellow and Postdoctoral Research Associate, Princeton University Privacy law differs…