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105 Computer Science

October 2007

Monday, October 8, 2007
@4:30 pm
105 Computer Science

Daniel Solove – The Future of Reputation: Gossip, Rumor, and Privacy on the Internet

Daniel Solove, an expert on privacy and the law, will paint a picture of the world that may be coming as the Facebook generation grows up. A member of the law faculty at George Washington University, Professor Solove blogs at Concurring Opinions. Q&A, and a brief reception, will follow the talk. For more information, contact David Robinson, Associate Director of the Center for Information Technology Policy.

November 2007

Thursday, November 29, 2007
@4:30 pm
105 Computer Science

Nancy Baym: Understanding the Networked Audience

Once viewed as passive consumers, media fans today are not just active, they are organized. Fans use the internet to form communities and networks, to produce their own artistic materials, to publicize what catches their fancies, to form personal alliances and friendships, to petition producers, and even to raise money for charities. They influence media producers in unprecedented ways, challenging old hierarchies. In a world of MySpace and YouTube, engaging fans is no longer a matter of mass communication, but…

October 2008

Wednesday, October 8, 2008
@4:30 pm
105 Computer Science

Luis von Ahn: Games With A Purpose

Reception immediately following Over 200 million hours are spent playing computer and video games every day in the United States. Indeed, by age 21, the average American has spent over 10,000 hours playing such games – at eight hours per day and five days per week, that's equivalent to five years of working a full time job. What if this time and energy could be channeled into useful work? What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without…

April 2011

Thursday, April 21, 2011
@8:00 pm
105 Computer Science

Susan Landau: Surveillance or Security? The Risks Posed by New Wiretapping Technologies

Sponsored by PRINCETON ACM/IEEE-CS CHAPTERS Large portions of business and commerce have been moved onto IP-based networks -- leaving us highly exposed and vulnerable to cyberattack. Despite this, US law enforcement and national security policy remain firmly focused on building wiretapping systems within the communications infrastructure: surveillance paradigms that do not easily fit the new technologies of the Internet. Are we building tools that could be easily turned against us? How do we get communications security right? Susan Landau is…

May 2011

Friday, May 13, 2011
@9:00 am
105 Computer Science

Privacy, Access, Technology, and the Future of Litigation in the United States

Overview Schedule Bios Directions/Logistics This conference is free and open to the public. Registration is open until the event begins, but only attendees registered by Tuesday, May 10, 2011 will receive lunch and a name tag. New Jersey and New York CLE credit is available for lawyers who attend. We are in an era of constantly evolving communications technologies. Electronic access to judicial records and proceedings has the prospect of furthering transparency of the 'Third Branch' of government and increasing…

May 2012

Thursday, May 17, 2012
@12:30 pm
105 Computer Science

Carl A. Gunter – Security and Privacy for the Smart Grid

The electric power grid pre-dates computer and digital networking technologies. As these technologies have progressed the power grid has shifted from electro-mechanical devices toward networked computers as a foundation for intelligence and control. This trend has culminated in the concept of the "Smart Grid", which envisions the use of networked computers to transform the reliability and efficiency of power delivery. While providing many benefits, this change also invites some of the security and privacy threats that have plagued networked computers…

February 2015

Tuesday, February 24, 2015
@4:30 pm
105 Computer Science

Matt Fredrikson – Inference Attacks: Understanding Privacy in the Era of “Privacy is Dead”

As data from far-reaching sources is collected, aggregated, and re-packaged to enable new and smarter applications, confidentiality and data security are at greater risk than ever before. Some of the most surprising and invasive threats to materialize in recent years are brought about by so-called inference attacks: successful attempts to learn sensitive information by leveraging public data such as social network updates, published research articles, and web APIs.

In this talk, I will focus on two of my research efforts to better understand and defend against these attacks.T he second part of the talk will detail work that helps developers correctly write privacy-aware applications using verification tools.

April 2015

Monday, April 13, 2015
@4:30 pm
105 Computer Science

Bryan Larish – Software-Defined Networking at the National Security Agency

The IT department at the NSA is similar to many other large organizations; budgets and manpower are declining, while at the same time demands for higher reliability and additional services are increasing. Because of these factors, these IT departments must change how they do business when building their IT infrastructure. Open networking and software defined networking (SDN) are two promising technology trends that the NSA is applying to resolve these challenges in different areas of its network architecture. This talk will detail that element's open networking and SDN initiatives in three areas: an OpenStack data center; a data center that hosts a storage cloud; and the campus area networks at branch offices. The talk will describe the motivation for each initiative, the architectures and solutions considered, and early-on lessons learned from development and deployment.

February 2020

Tuesday, February 25, 2020
@12:30 pm
- 1:30 pm
105 Computer Science

Aleksandra Korolova – Aligning the Web Ecosystem with Societal Values via Measurements, Definitions and Algorithms

The web ecosystem relies on data- and algorithms- driven innovation and monetization. In this talk, the challenges and opportunities for aligning these practices with societal values such as privacy and fairness will be explored.

March 2020

Monday, March 9, 2020
@12:30 pm
- 1:30 pm
105 Computer Science

Rediet Abebe – Designing Algorithms for Social Good

Algorithmic and artificial intelligence techniques show immense potential to deepen our understanding of socioeconomic inequality and inform interventions designed to improve access to opportunity. Interventions aimed at historically under-served communities are made particularly ...