Faculty & Staff

Edward W. Felten

Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs; Director, Center of Information Technology Policy; Director, Program in Technology and Society, Information Technology Track

609-258-5906
302 Sherrerd Hall

Ed was the first Chief Technologist for the Federal Trade Commission from January 2011 until September 2012. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology. Specific topics include software security, Internet security, electronic voting, cybersecurity policy, technology for government transparency, network neutrality and Internet policy.

Ed often blogs about technology and policy at Freedom to Tinker.

Joanna Huey

Associate Director

609-258-2175
304 Sherrerd Hall

Joanna’s interests include access to legal information, civic engagement, and science and technology education. Prior to joining CITP, she clerked for the Honorable Michael Boudin, worked as a business associate at Goodwin Procter, and co-founded Casetext, a Y Combinator-backed startup. She holds an A.B. in physics and math from Harvard College, an M.P.P. in science and technology policy from the Harvard Kennedy School, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School, where she was president of the Harvard Law Review.

Laura Cummings-Abdo

Center Manager

609-258-9658
303 Sherrerd Hall

Edward W. Felten

Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs; Director, Center of Information Technology Policy; Director, Program in Technology and Society, Information Technology Track

609-258-5906
309 Sherrerd Hall

Ed was the first Chief Technologist for the Federal Trade Commission from January 2011 until September 2012. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology. Specific topics include software security, Internet security, electronic voting, cybersecurity policy, technology for government transparency, network neutrality and Internet policy.

Ed often blogs about technology and policy at Freedom to Tinker.

Andrew W. Appel

Eugene Higgins Professor of Computer Science. Chair, Department of Computer Science

609-258-4627
Computer Science Building

Andrew’s research is in computer security, programming languages and compilers, automated theorem proving, and technology policy. He received his A.B. summa cum laude in physics from Princeton in 1981, and his PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1985. He has been Editor in Chief of ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems and is a Fellow of the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery).

Paul J. DiMaggio

A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs. Founding Director, Center for the Study of Social Organization

609-258-1971
308 Sherrerd Hall

Paul has written widely on organizational analysis, sociology of culture, and social inequality. Among the several books he has written or edited are The New Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis (with Walter Powell); Race, Ethnicity and Participation in the Arts (with Francie Ostrower); and The 21st-Century Firm: Changing Economic Organization in International Perspective. He has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (1984-85) and a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1990). He has also served on the Connecticut Commission on the Arts and on the board of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies.
His interests include the sociology of art and culture, social stratification, economic sociology, complex organizations, and the social implications of technology. He is involved in research on inequality of access to the new digital technologies, new approaches to identifying patterns in attitude data, and patterns of participation in the arts.

Margaret Martonosi

Professor of Computer Science

609-258-1912
204 Computer Science Building

Margaret has been on the faculty since 1994. In 2011, she served as Acting Director of Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP). She also holds an affiliated faculty appointment in Princeton EE. From 2005-2007, she served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Martonosi’s research interests are in computer architecture and the hardware-software interface, with particular focus on power-efficient systems and mobile computing. Her work has included the development of the Wattch power modeling tool, the first architecture level power modeling infrastructure for superscalar processors. In the field of mobile computing and sensor networks, Martonosi led the Princeton ZebraNet project, which included two real-world deployments of tracking collars on zebras in Central Kenya. Her current research focuses on power-performance tradeoffs in parallel systems ranging from chip multiprocessors to large-scale data centers.

Martonosi is a Fellow of both IEEE and ACM. In 2010, she received Princeton University’s Graduate Mentoring Award. In addition to many archival publications, Martonosi is an inventor on six granted US patents, and has co-authored a technical reference book on power-aware computer architecture. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Computing Research Association (CRA), CRA-W, and ACM SIGARCH. Martonosi completed her Ph.D. at Stanford University, and also holds a Master’s degree from Stanford and a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, all in Electrical Engineering.

Michael Oppenheimer

Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences

609-258-1971
448 Robertson Hall

Michael is the Director of the Program in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) at the Woodrow Wilson School and Faculty Associate of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences Program, Princeton Environmental Institute, and the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies. His interests include science and policy of the atmosphere, particularly climate change and its impacts. Much of his research aims to understand the potential for “dangerous” outcomes of increasing levels of greenhouse gases by exploring the effects of global warming on ecosystems such as coral reefs, on the ice sheets and sea level, and on patterns of human migration. He also studies the process of scientific learning and scientific assessments and their role in problems of global change.

Michael is the author of over 100 articles published in professional journals and is co-author (with Robert H. Boyle) of a 1990 book, Dead Heat: The Race Against The Greenhouse Effect.

These individuals come from a wide range of departments and subfields, and all do work that touches on the intersection of digital technologies and public policy.

Andrew W. Appel

Eugene Higgins Professor of Computer Science. Chair, Department of Computer Science

609-258-4627
Computer Science Building

Andrew’s research is in computer security, programming languages and compilers, automated theorem proving, and technology policy. He received his A.B. summa cum laude in physics from Princeton in 1981, and his PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1985. He has been Editor in Chief of ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems and is a Fellow of the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery).

David Blei

Associate Professor of Computer Science

609-258-9907
419 Computer Science Building

David’s research is in developing machine learning algorithms for uncovering structure in large data sets. He has focused on text data, developing “topic modeling” algorithms for finding the latent thematic structure of large corpora such as scientific publications, web pages, and news articles. His other research interests include image processing, approximate inference in probabilistic graphical models, and nonparametric Bayesian statistics.

Paul W. Cuff

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

609-258-7946
B316 Engineering Quad B-Wing

Paul’s research in information theory is largely focused on the fundamental limits of communication in multiuser settings. In addition to moving information around in the classical sense, some alternative questions arise when you consider using information to coordinate actions in a control setting. The mathematical tools needed to characterize the limits of compression in these settings are related to rate-distortion theory and require additional novel concepts as well.

Paul J. DiMaggio

A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs. Founding Director, Center for the Study of Social Organization

609-258-1971
308 Sherrerd Hall

Paul has written widely on organizational analysis, sociology of culture, and social inequality. Among the several books he has written or edited are The New Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis (with Walter Powell); Race, Ethnicity and Participation in the Arts (with Francie Ostrower); and The 21st-Century Firm: Changing Economic Organization in International Perspective. He has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (1984-85) and a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1990). He has also served on the Connecticut Commission on the Arts and on the board of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies.
His interests include the sociology of art and culture, social stratification, economic sociology, complex organizations, and the social implications of technology. He is involved in research on inequality of access to the new digital technologies, new approaches to identifying patterns in attitude data, and patterns of participation in the arts.

Edward W. Felten

Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs; Director, Center of Information Technology Policy; Director, Program in Technology and Society, Information Technology Track

609-258-5906
309 Sherrerd Hall

Ed was the first Chief Technologist for the Federal Trade Commission from January 2011 until September 2012. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology. Specific topics include software security, Internet security, electronic voting, cybersecurity policy, technology for government transparency, network neutrality and Internet policy.

Ed often blogs about technology and policy at Freedom to Tinker.

Michael J. Freedman

Assistant Professor of Computer Science

609-258-9179
308 Computer Science Building

Mike’s research focus is on distributed systems, networking, and security. He developed and operates several self-managing systems — including CoralCDN, a decentralized content distribution network, and DONAR, a server resolution system powering the FCC’s Consumer Broadband Test — which serve millions of users daily. Other research has included software-defined and service-centric networking, untrusted cloud services, fault-tolerant cloud storage, virtual world systems, peer-to-peer systems, and various privacy-enhancing and anti-censorship systems. Freedman’s work on IP geolocation and intelligence led him to co-found Illuminics Systems, which was acquired by Quova, Inc. in 2006. His work on programmable enterprise networking (Ethane) helped form the basis for the OpenFlow / software-defined networking architecture. Honors include a Sloan Fellowship, NSF CAREER Award, ONR Young Investigator Award, and DARPA Computer Science Study Group membership.

Stanley N. Katz

Lecturer with the rank of Professor in Public and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School

609-258-5637
428 Robertson Hall

Stan’s many interests include the future of digitally-enabled scholarship, which was the topic of an online, multi-institution symposium hosted by the Center. He contributes to the group blog Brainstorm: Lives of the Mind at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Brian Kernighan

Professor of Computer Science

609-258-2089
311 Computer Science Building

Brian, whose distinguished career at Bell Labs included key roles in the development of AT&T Unix and the C programming language, is a leader in explaining computers and computer science to the lay public. His popular undergraduate course, Computers in Our World, introduces humanists and social scientists to computing, providing them with the background and depth to understand digital issues that are of current policy interest.
Brian also writes the “Hello, World” column in the Daily Princetonian.

Sanjeev R. Kulkarni

Professor of Electrical Engineering. Director, Keller Center for Innovation in Engineering Education. Master, Butler College

609-258-6727
B310 Engineering Quad B-Wing

Sanjeev’s research interests span several areas including machine learning, pattern recognition, information theory, and signal/image/video processing. He is an affiliated faculty member in the Department of Operations Research and in the Department of Philosophy.

Ruby B. Lee

Forrest G. Hamrick Professor in Engineering. Professor of Electrical Engineering

609-258-1426
B218 Engineering Quad B-Wing

Ruby’s current research interests are in Secure Cloud Computing, and hardware-enhanced systems security. She was co-leader of the National Cyber Leap Year Summit sponsored by 13 government agencies that brought government, industry and university experts together to look at game-changing strategies for improving cyber security. She was also committee member of the congress-mandated National Academies study on improving cyber security research in the U.S. She teaches an undergraduate course in Cyber Security open to both technical and non-technical majors on the technology and related policy issues underlying security in cyberspace.

Margaret Martonosi

Professor of Computer Science
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609-258-1912
204 Computer Science Building

Margaret has been on the faculty since 1994. In 2011, she served as Acting Director of Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP). She also holds an affiliated faculty appointment in Princeton EE. From 2005-2007, she served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Martonosi’s research interests are in computer architecture and the hardware-software interface, with particular focus on power-efficient systems and mobile computing. Her work has included the development of the Wattch power modeling tool, the first architecture level power modeling infrastructure for superscalar processors. In the field of mobile computing and sensor networks, Martonosi led the Princeton ZebraNet project, which included two real-world deployments of tracking collars on zebras in Central Kenya. Her current research focuses on power-performance tradeoffs in parallel systems ranging from chip multiprocessors to large-scale data centers.

Martonosi is a Fellow of both IEEE and ACM. In 2010, she received Princeton University’s Graduate Mentoring Award. In addition to many archival publications, Martonosi is an inventor on six granted US patents, and has co-authored a technical reference book on power-aware computer architecture. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Computing Research Association (CRA), CRA-W, and ACM SIGARCH. Martonosi completed her Ph.D. at Stanford University, and also holds a Master’s degree from Stanford and a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, all in Electrical Engineering.

Prateek Mittal

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

Engineering Quad, Room B308

Prateek Mittal is an Assistant Professor in Electrical Engineering at Princeton, and an affiliated faculty member at the Center for Information Technology Policy. He was previously a post-doctoral scholar at the University of California Berkeley in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences.

Arvind Narayanan

Assistant Professor of Computer Science

609-258-9302
308 Sherrerd Hall

Arvind Narayanan is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science at Princeton, and an affiliated faculty member at the Center for Information Technology Policy. He was previously a post-doctoral fellow at the Stanford Computer Science department and a Junior Affiliate Scholar at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. He studies privacy from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on the intersection between technology, law and policy. His research has shown that data anonymization is broken in fundamental ways, for which he jointly received the 2008 Privacy Enhancing Technologies Award. He is one of the researchers behind the “Do Not Track” proposal. You can follow Arvind on Twitter at @random_walker and on Google+ here.

Michael Oppenheimer

Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences

609-258-1971
448 Robertson Hall

Michael is the Director of the Program in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) at the Woodrow Wilson School and Faculty Associate of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences Program, Princeton Environmental Institute, and the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies. His interests include science and policy of the atmosphere, particularly climate change and its impacts. Much of his research aims to understand the potential for “dangerous” outcomes of increasing levels of greenhouse gases by exploring the effects of global warming on ecosystems such as coral reefs, on the ice sheets and sea level, and on patterns of human migration. He also studies the process of scientific learning and scientific assessments and their role in problems of global change.

Michael is the author of over 100 articles published in professional journals and is co-author (with Robert H. Boyle) of a 1990 book, Dead Heat: The Race Against The Greenhouse Effect.

Vivek S. Pai

Associate Professor of Computer Science

609-258-2086
322 Computer Science Building

Vivek has worked in numerous areas of server design and performance, from the depths of optimizing TCP checksum performance and eliminating buffer copying, all the way up to designing scalable content delivery infrastructures. In the middle, he has worked on improving OS performance for server applications, designing software architectures for high-performance servers, and developing intelligent server clustering algorithms. He co-founded iMimic Networking, where he helped architect and develop the fastest Web proxy server in the world. iMimic was acquired by Ironport Systems, which was subsequently acquired by Cisco. He also co-founded CoBlitz LLC, doing the same for content delivery networks, which was later acquired by Verivue.

Larry Peterson

Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science

609-258-6077
208 Computer Science Building

Larry is Director of the Princeton-hosted PlanetLab consortium. He has chaired the planning effort behind the GENI Project, the Global Environment for Network Innovation. The GENI platform could allow researchers to test alternatives to the incumbent technological standards that make the Internet work.

Markus Prior

Associate Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School. Co-Director, Center for the Study of Democratic Politics

609-258-2749
313 Robertson Hall

Markus studies the ways that new communications technologies shape political behavior. He is the author of the book Post-Broadcast Democracy: How Media Choice Increases Inequality in Political Involvement and Polarizes Elections. His research interest include audience measurement for old and new media.

Jennifer L. Rexford

Professor of Computer Science

609-258-5182
306 Computer Science Building

Professor Rexford, who came to Princeton in 2005 after eight and a half years at AT&T Research, is interested in Internet policy and Internet governance, stemming from her longstanding research on computer networks. She co-chairs the Secure BGP Deployment working group of the FCC’s Communications Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council, and chairs the Mobile Broadband working group of the FCC’s Open Internet Advisory Committee. Collaborating with a multi-institution group of colleagues, she has published papers on “Risking communications security: Potential hazards of the Protect America Act” (IEEE Security and Privacy) and “Can it really work? Problems with Extending EINSTEIN 3 to critical infrastructure” (Harvard Law School’s National Security Journal).

Matthew J. Salganik

Professor of Sociology

609-258-8867
145 Wallace Hall

Matthew’s interests include social networks, quantitative methods, and web-based social research. One main area of his research has focused on developing network-based statistical methods for studying populations most at risk for HIV/AIDS. A second main area of work has been using the World Wide Web to collect and analyze social data in innovative ways. Salganik’s research has been published in journals such as Science, PNAS, Sociological Methodology, and Journal of the American Statistical Association. His papers have won the Outstanding Article Award from the Mathematical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association and the Outstanding Statistical Application Award from the American Statistical Association. Popular accounts of his work have appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Economist, and New Yorker. Salganik’s research is funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Joint United Nations Program for HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), and Google.

Paul E. Starr

Stuart Professor of Communications and Public Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School. Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs

609-258-4533
124 Wallace Hall

Paul is the co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect. At Princeton he holds the Stuart Chair in Communications and Public Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School. He received the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction and Bancroft Prize in American History for The Social Transformation of American Medicine and the 2005 Goldsmith Book Prize for The Creation of the Media. His most recent book Freedom’s Power, on the history and promise of liberalism, is now out in paperback.

Janet Vertesi

Assistant Professor of Sociology

609-258-8724
122 Wallace Hall

Janet is a sociologist of science and technology who is interested the relationships between science, technology and society. Her research focuses on NASA robotic spacecraft teams, and how organizational dynamics matter to team decision-making, data-sharing, and scientific results. She also works in Human-Computer Interaction, where her publications include topics such as scientific data-sharing, GPS tracking and notions of privacy, personal archiving practices, and technologies in transnational context. At Princeton, Janet runs Tech/Soc, an interdisciplinary reading group co-sponsored by CITP devoted to questions of technology and society; her courses on the Sociology of Technology are accredited towards the Certificate in Information Technology and Society.